Power Pack 3.0.2: Fixes for Team Foundation Server

Power Pack 3.0.2 improves integration with Microsoft’s Team Foundation Server:

  • Copied files containing non-ASCII filenames can now be diffed
  • Compatibility between various versions of Review Board, Python, and Team Foundation Server has improved

There’s also several behind-the-scenes changes preparing Power Pack for new features we have in the works, and for the upcoming Review Board 4.0 release.

Update Today

Power Pack 3.0.2 is recommended for all Power Pack users reviewing code over Team Foundation Server.

To upgrade, or to install for the first time, see the installation instructions.

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RBTools 1.0.2: Fixes for Python 3, Two-Factor Auth, and More

Improved Python 3 Support

RBTools 1.0 introduced support for Python 3, and since then many more of our users have switched over and sent us patches to improve that support. We’ve also improved our testing, helping us to maintain a more stable Python 3 codebase.

Two-Factor Auth for RBCommons

The support for Two-Factor Authentication in RBCommons has been completely redone to avoid login rate limit issues, missing headers, and trouble logging in.

Going forward, RBTools 1.0.2 will be the minimum version required for RBCommons accounts using Two-Factor Authentication.

Git Improvements

We’ve improved upon the smart tracking branch detection logic introduced in RBTools 1.0, which is designed to find the right tracking branch for your local changes. It now does a better job of finding a suitable branch if your repository doesn’t have an origin remote, and gives priority to the one provided in --tracking-branch.

Support for disabling Git file rename detection has also been added, for those cases where Git is getting too aggressive and making for bad diffs. Simply pass --no-renames to rbt post or rbt diff to generate a diff without renamed files.

A Step Toward Better Error Messages

We’ve working to improve error messages throughout our products, to help guide people when things go wrong.

If RBTools is pointing to a bad Review Board URL, it no longer just fails with an HTTP status code or cryptic error message. RBTools will now inspect the URL to determine what may have gone wrong, and offer guidance on resolving the problem.

Error messages in our API and other commands have also been fixed. We’ll be making further improvements in future releases.

Plus More

  • Perforce diffs now contain information on binary files
  • Aliases invoking shell commands now preserve their quotes and escape sequences
  • Patches from users with private profiles enabled can now be applied to new commits without crashing

See the release notes for the full list of changes.

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Power Pack 3.0: PDF Diffs and License Updates

The new major release of Power Pack 3.0 brings the ability to diff PDF documents, comparing how the text of the document changes between revisions, and makes it easier to manage your license subscriptions.

Viewing Differences in PDFs

This can drastically cut down on the time needed to read through documents as the author takes in suggested edits from reviewers. Just like a code diff, any text changes made in a document are shown inline in the PDF, color-coded for easier viewing.

A handy new sidebar view catalogues all the changes made throughout the document, so there’s no need to carefully scrutinize as you scroll.

If you do need to scroll, a new “Lock scroll” checkbox gives you control over whether the documents should scroll in sync, or scroll individually.

In order to enable diffing support for PDFs, you will need a PDF document that contains text information embedded in the document (such as when printing to PDF or using OCR on a scanned document). It’s also important to update the existing PDF file attachment with the new document, instead of creating a brand new upload.

Easier License Management

We’ve revamped the Power Pack configuration page to better show the status and health of your license, how quickly the expiration date is coming up or whether you’re hitting your user cap.

The new “Manage your license” button takes you straight to our license portal where you can renew your license, convert to a yearly subscription, add additional users, and more.

Power Pack now checks for updates to your license automatically when viewing the Power Pack configuration page, and will install any new license it finds. You no longer need to download and install new license files from the license portal yourself.

Plus the Usual Bug Fixes

We’ve sorted out some crashes and visual glitches in reports, as well as a compatibility problem with AWS CodeCommit. The full list of changes are in the release notes.

Get started today with a 30 day trial license. After 30 days, enjoy a complimentary license for up to 2 users forever, or purchase a license for the rest of your organization.

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RBTools 1.0.1 is out now

Today’s release of RBTools fixes some of the most common issues experienced in the recent 1.0 release:

Improved Windows compatibility

This release fixes some regressions on Windows, namely a crash when prompting for a password for Review Board.

If you’re continuing to hit problems on Windows, please let us know in our community support tracker so we can collect additional information on your setup.

Fixes for Empty Diff errors on Git

While RBTools 1.0 greatly improved how diffs were generated for Git repositories under many scenarios, it broke one important workflow.

Posting a branch for review after pushing that branch upstream no longer results in errors about empty diffs when a tracking branch is configured. Instead, the tracking branch is once again respected, allowing your topic branch to be posted for review in full.

See the release notes for the full list of changes.

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RBTools 1.0 is here!

RBTools has been an important part of the life of Review Board users for many years. While it started off as a single tool for posting review requests, its feature set has evolved with time, turning into an extensible set of tools and APIs for talking to Review Board.

Today, we’re finally pulling RBTools out of the 0.x era with the release of RBTools 1.0.

Compatible with Python 3

Both the RBTools commands and the Python API now support Python 2.7 and 3.5+.

(Please let us know if you hit any issues on Python 3, as this is still pretty new.)

Better Repository Detection and Git Support

RBTools now does a better job determining which repository it’s working with, in case there’s confusion. For example, a Mercurial repository nested in a Git-managed home directory will no longer cause problems.

Git repositories in particular are now easier to work with. When generating a diff, RBTools now looks for the nearest upstream parent commit or branch, instead of requiring that users or repositories configure a specific tracking branch.

Publish Automated Reviews

Writing your own automated review solutions for Review Board 3.0 or RBCommons just became easier through the new rbt status-update command. Your scripts can use it to file a pending status update on a review request (showing that checks are being performed) and then update it to say that all is well or to report issues that need to be fixed.

This is useful for in-house continuous integration setups where you’re analyzing code for errors, style issues, documentation, or any other requirements you might have.

Easily Land Complex Dependent Changes

rbt land can now land multiple review requests tied together using the Depends On field.

This works with -r to take the ID of the review request you want to land. It will figure out which review requests must land before it and in which order. For example, if review request 3 depends on 2, which depends on 1, you can run:

$ rbt land --recursive -r 3

Instead of:

$ rbt land -r 1
$ rbt land -r 2
$ rbt land -r 3

This is a precursor to the new DVCS support coming soon in Review Board 4.0.

And That’s Not All

  • rbt setup-completion was added to enable auto-completion of RBTools commands and arguments in Bash and ZSH shells.

  • rbt alias was added to help you list and test out your custom aliases.

  • rbt post –submit-as can now automate posting review request updates, and not just new review requests, on a user’s behalf.

  • rbt post -m and rbt publish -m let you specify a custom description of your draft’s changes when publishing (equivalent to filling out the “Describe your changes” box when publishing in the browser).

  • rbt post –trivial-publish and rbt publish –trivial let you publish trivial updates to a review request without sending out e-mails to everyone (when using Review Board 3.0 or RBCommons).

  • rbt status now lists the review state and local branch for each review request you have up for review.

  • Warnings and errors in command output is now specially highlighted to help it stand out.

  • Several fixes and improvements for Git and Subversion compatibility.

  • The API has been improved, supporting extra_data fields and easier pagination of resources.

And plenty of other fixes and improvements. See the release notes for the full list of changes in 1.0.

Download It Today!

RBTools is out today for Windows, Linux, and Mac. Head on over to the downloads page for installation instructions.

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A New Era of Privacy – Beanbag, Review Board, and You

If you’ve been on the Internet at all in the past few weeks, you’ve likely been bombarded by e-mails from every service you’ve ever used telling you that they’ve updated their privacy policy.

Yes, we’ve updated ours too, but we want to talk to you about how we manage your data, the greater picture of privacy on the Internet, the European Union’s new GDPR legislation, and why this all matters to you, no matter where you are in the world.

GDPR: A new standard for privacy

On May 25th, the GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) goes into effect in the EU. It gives users there an unprecedented level of control and insight into their personal information. Amongst other things:

  • People must be able to change, delete, or request copies of their personally identifiable information
  • Companies need a valid legal basis for the usage of that information (which may require getting consent for that use)
  • Handing that data off to third-parties also requires a legal basis, and must be documented in a privacy policy
  • That privacy policy must be able to be read and understood without a law degree

You must admit, that’s pretty nice. Though companies are not required to give these rights to non-EU residents, many (including us) are treating this as a new global standard.

Some parts of the GDPR are a bit vague and not all companies see eye-to-eye on the level of control you should have. We’re hoping our approach goes above and beyond.

Our new privacy guarantees

We’ve always collected as little data as needed. We don’t need much, except to provide services to you, to aid in team communication, and to make use of third-party services we trust who help us run our business and provide support to you.

Still, under the GDPR, there was more for us to do. So here’s what we’re promising:

  • We’ll continue to only collect what we strictly need, and to document it clearly in our Privacy Policy.
  • We’ll continue to give you control of your data, and handle deletion and alteration requests, as we always have.
  • We’ve updated our services to request your consent (and give you full control over it at any time) for any optional usage of your personal information, and any usage we strictly require to run our services effectively will be clearly documented.
  • We’ve never sold your information and never will.
  • We’re extending the rights granted by the GDPR to all users of our products, everywhere.
  • If you ever have any questions or concerns about your data, we’re always here to help.

To help, we’ve built a whole new privacy-focused framework in Djblets to help with privacy guarantees and consent requests. All our software will be using this and we’ll be encouraging Review Board extension authors to use it. We’ll talk about this in more detail in an upcoming post.

What to expect by May 25th

Our Privacy Policy is up now, and will take effect on May 25th, 2018.

We’ll be activating the enhanced privacy support on RBCommons, reviewboard.org, reviews.reviewboard.org, and Splat in time for the 25th. If you’re a user on these, the next time you connect you’ll be asked to accept the Privacy Policy and to allow or block usage of your information for some services.

We’ll also be releasing Review Board 3.0.7 and Djblets 1.0.6, which are privacy-enhanced, optionally allowing for Terms of Service and Privacy Policy URLs and GDPR-compliant consent functionality. Many servers may not need this, but it’ll be available for those that do.

If you want to change, delete, or request any of your personal information from our servers, or want more information on all this, reach out to us at any time and we’ll help. You don’t need to wait for May 25th.

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RBCommons 3.0 is Live!

Over the weekend, we deployed a new major version of RBCommons, offering many new features and laying the groundwork for additional ones we’ll be bringing you soon.

 

New code review capabilities, including revokable Ship-Its, general comments not tied to code or file attachments, and the ability to require verification before issues are resolved.

Discussions are now easier to follow. New updates, reviews, and replies are highlighted in blue, helping them stand out. Desktop notifications let your browser notify you when there’s new updates to the page. Images can be dropped into text fields to provide some visuals with your comment. Emoji shortcodes can be used.

New repository support for Bitbucket Server, AWS CodeCommit, and Gerrit. Host your code there, review it here.

Feature improvements are everywhere. Custom avatar images can be set on your account. There are handy buttons for quickly navigating between file attachments. High-DPI image attachments are scale to fit on your screen. Review requests can be re-assigned to other team members.

RBCommons is faster. Along with optimizations in the new version, we’ve also begun moving parts of our architecture onto new servers, with more coming this week. You should start seeing those benefits soon.

See all the new features available today!

 

Coming soon, we’ll be bringing integrations with Slack and Mattermost chat, continuous integration with Travis CI and CircleCI, support for searching review requests, and new billing improvements (separate billing contact and administrative roles, and CC’ing invoices to an address of your choosing). We’re still testing these internally, and plan to start rolling these out in stages over the next couple months.

We hope you like the new RBCommons! As always, if you have any questions or hit any problems, we’re only a chat message away 🙂

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Announcing kgb 2.0 for Python – Function spies for unit tests

We’ve just released a new major version of kgb, a Python library for creating function spies in unit tests. This is a very handy tool for helping craft unit tests in Python applications.

kgb 2.0 introduces support for Python 3.6, improves argument checking, and removes the need for a special .spy attribute on standard functions.

What are function spies?

Function spies allow you to listen for when functions are called, what parameters they were passed, what value they returned or exception they raised, and allow you to disable the function’s normal behavior and optionally replace it with your own. This is a popular feature of Jasmine, a testing framework for JavaScript.

They’re particularly useful when working with third-party libraries whose behavior you cannot normally change. For example, your project might call a function in a library that in turn calls out to a HTTP server, which might be problematic for your unit test. With kgb, you can simply spy on urllib2.urlopen and return a custom result.

For example:

import logging
from unittest import TestCase
from urllib2 import urlopen

from kgb import SpyAgency


class MyTests(SpyAgency, TestCase):
    def test_http_request(self):
        def _fake_urlopen(opener, *args, **kwargs):
            self.assertEqual(url.get_full_url(),
                             'https://example.com/123/')

            class FakeResult(object):
                def read(self):
                    return 'Your fake payload goes here!'

            return _FakeResult()

        self.spy_on(urlopen, call_fake=_fake_urlopen)

        # Imagine that this function makes an HTTP request to
        # https://example.com/123/ and logs a message.
        some_function_that_does_urlopen()

        self.assertTrue(urlopen.called)
        self.assertTrue(logging.info.called_with(
            'Fetching something from an API'))

What’s new in kgb 2.0?

Better, more consistent spies

We removed the distinction between spying on standard functions and methods on classes. This used to be treated differently. Previously, you could call spy functions like .called_with() and access attributes like .last_call directly on the method, but for functions, you had to use .spy.called_with() and .spy.last_call. We also kept plain functions mostly intact, but replaced methods on a class with a method-like object designed to intercept calls and mimic the method’s signature. That meant things were different depending on what you were spying on.

We now keep the methods where they are, bringing the spy functions and attributes onto the spied functions directly. We also use a special bytecode injection process for all spying operations (it’s very complicated, but awesome).

What does this ultimately mean? Well, it means if you had code from older versions that looked like this:

self.assertTrue(my_func.spy.called)

You can trim off the .spy part:

self.assertTrue(my_func.called)

It also means that we’re spying at a lower level than before for methods on classes, helping to prevent problems with code that’s sensitive to methods being replaced.

And it gives us Python 3.6 support.

Python 3.6 and PyPy support

See, there it is!

kgb 2.0 now fully works with Python 3.6. And as a bonus, PyPy as well.

More flexible and descriptive argument checks

called_with() now lets you check positional arguments by specifying their names as keyword arguments, and doesn’t require that you check for all arguments passed to the function. For example, if you have this method:

def my_func(a, b, c=123):
    pass

you can inspect the calls with:

self.assertTrue(my_func.called_with(b=True))

Hand-holding when things go wrong

If something goes wrong in your test suite and your spy fails to unregister at the end of the test, you could get some pretty confusing assertion errors in older versions of kgb. Same if you accidentally try spying on the same function twice in your tests.

In kgb 2.0, we check for this and present a very helpful error showing you exactly where the spy was originally set so you don’t have to hunt it down yourself.

Learn more about kgb

We’re biased, but this is a really nifty library, and has made our lives so much easier. We have full documentation up on GitHub showing all the ways you can work with spies, along with a FAQ.

Installation is easy. Just run:

$ pip install kgb

kgb supports Python 2.6 through 2.7 and 3.4 through 3.6, along with new, experimental support for PyPy.

If you find kgb useful, please tell others about it, and give it a star on GitHub.

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RBCommons updates have moved to the Beanbag Blog

For years, we’ve been maintaining three separate blogs for our products: the RBCommons Blog, Review Board News, and the Beanbag Blog. It made sense at the time to keep these separate, but these days it’s usually more confusing than it needs to be, with release announcements and helpful guides scattered across the blogs.

We began the process of consolidating these last night, and started with merging the RBCommons Blog into the Beanbag Blog. Unfortunately, due to a glitch with our mailing list provider, an e-mail went out today covering last February’s CloudFlare-related security issue. If you received this, we’re very sorry — that shouldn’t have happened, and you don’t need to worry about some new problem affecting RBCommons.

We’ll be posting more articles here going forward, along with RBCommons updates and RBTools release announcements. We recently started a series of articles on new Review Board features that will soon make its way to RBCommons as part of a major update we’re gearing up for.

We’re also planning to move the Review Board release announcements here, so there’s exactly one place to look for everything we’re working on.

And with that, we’d like to thank you all for being such wonderful customers. Have a Happy New Year, everyone! Here’s to a great 2018 🙂

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Introducing Issue Verification and Ship-It! Revocation

We’ve all been there…

It’s a week before the deadline. Your team is working through the night, eager to land their changes as quickly as possible. Your teammate, Jake, was feeling frazzled as he was trying to fix all the issues that had been filed on his review request. He’d just finished the issue you had filed and marked it “fixed.” Shortly after, another teammate files a new review with a “Ship It!” Breathing a sigh of relief, and eager to go home, Jake immediately lands the change.

It wasn’t until after the release of the product that you realized Jake had missed something important in your feedback. While his change had fixed the bug, it had broken another feature. You hadn’t had the chance to look over his change after he’d fixed it, since you were busy and it had fallen off your dashboard once it landed. If only Jake knew you wanted to take a second look, the release would have gone a lot more smoothly.

With Review Board 3.0, you can prevent this from ever happening again. We’ve added a new feature, Issue Verification, which keeps issues open until the reviewer has a chance to verify the fix.

You can activate this feature by checking the “Require Verification” box when opening a new issue.

 

 

Once the owner of the change resolves the issue as “Fixed” or “Dropped,” the status will change to “Pending Verification.” At this point, the issue is still considered open. It will be up to the reviewer to look over the fix and click “Verify Fixed” before it can be closed.

 

Filed a Ship It! prematurely and wish you could take it back?

Now you can with Review Board 3.0’s new Revocable Ship It! feature. The “Ship It!” label on any reviews you file will now have a little “x” button. Just click and confirm that you want to revoke it, and the review’s “Ship It!” tag will be removed, with the “Ship It!” text crossed out in the review.

 

 

These new features will help ensure that important reviewer feedback is addressed and that an unintentional or outdated “Ship It!” review no longer lets changes into the codebase prematurely. These features have been requested by many of you, and we would love to hear if they improve the review process for your team!

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